Day 3: 264 Hours Remaining

I arrived having learned my next lesson like a dutiful schoolgirl. Instead of arriving close to the 10pm work time, I had someone drop me off closer to 9:30. The night before I had come to the gate only to be greeted by a gruff man with a horse voice: “We ain’t be needin you, sweetheart. We done already got two workers.”

Today I was going to make sure one of those two was me. This community service needs to have it’s butt kicked. I’m a midwife; service is my middle name. I’ve been trained for this job for years… cold, hunger, sleeplessness, latex glove wearing, cleaning up bodily fluids, smiling at irrational people. This is right up my alley.

To my great sadness I was back rolling toilet paper. And not just for four hours this time. All night.

But fortunately they let me do it in the clubhouse so I could watch television while I did it. Unfortunately, the television was set to a chanel that only played horror films all night and nobody new how to change that.

At some point in the middle of The Exorcism of Emily Rose a vet walked in. It was around 2:30 in the morning and he startled me a little. He was dragging his blanket like Linus and blinked in the dark, trying to get his eyes to adjust. He appeared to be in his mid fifties. He was average height, thin and his skin was as dark as mine is white. And my skin pretty much glows in the dark. We appeared to be as opposite, visually, as you can get in this world.

Eventually he saw me in the corner.

“Heynow! I didn’t see nobody in hare. You a communtee service worka?”

“Yes, sir. You a vet?”

“Yes ma’am. Shor am. And I can’t sleep fo sheeyit.”

“Well, have a seat. Can’t promise you’ll find sleep in here. They got bedtime stories on the TV.”

He looked at the TV for a few seconds and then laughed hard. “You ain’t kiddin. What da fuck this sheeyit they showin?”

“Horror movies.”

And he sat down.

For the next hour, “Slim” told me about his fight in Vietnam over the screams of a possessed Emily Rose telling us she was inhabited by legions of demons.

“Those mothafuckahs don’t help me fo sheeyit. Even if they came down hare right NOW, I wouldn’t fight fo them NO mo. Hell no. I took one bullet in ma shoulda and the medic says ‘lay down, Slim!’ and I keeps goin. And then the fuckahs hit me in the otha sholda. I shoulda died. I shoulda died. Now they can’t even give ma a token fo the bus to the VA offices.”

I was able to share with Slim that my daddy was a marine in Vietnam. His eyes lit up and he began to ask me questions about my conviction.

“You done the right thing, honey. Yo daddy’d be prouda ya.”

My daddy, if he had survived the military, could have been sitting right next to Slim.

 

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About supportmidwifekatiemccall

Katie McCall was born at Pomona Valley Hospital in Southern California by scheduled c-section as a frank breech due to the current medical system insistence that breeches should always be delivered that way. Katie's father's family was filled with teachers, her mother's family was filled with healers. It is no surprise then, that she went on to have her own two children and spend her adult life involved in a combination of teaching and healing through midwifery, childbirth education, doula work and serving families in Southern California. Katie attended USC for her general education and then went on to study with the American Academy of Husband Coached Childbirth to become a certified childbirth educator. Shortly thereafter, she certified as a birth doula (labor assistant) with the Association of Labor Assistants and Childbirth Educators. Katie was also mentored through a pregnancy and birth support business called The Birth Connection in Glendale, CA, which Katie later purchased and expanded to include a 1500 square foot education facility, retail store and birthing center. She enrolled in midwifery school and apprenticed with the midwives who ran the birth center as well as with midwives who attended homebirths. She sold her business to pursue her midwifery education full time in 2006 and passed her midwifery (NARM) exam to become a Certified Professional Midwife in 2008. She went on to gain her Midwifery License from the State of CA Medical Board in 2010. Katie has received supplementary education in lactation to become a lactation educator, vaginal birth after cesarean support, support of sexual abuse survivors, aromatherapy and is neonatal and CPR certified. She assisted over 500 couples through childbirth education and attended over 550 births as of 2011. As a Southern California native, she has a wide range of experience, serving mothers from diverse backgrounds. She believes her job is one of empowering women to develop their own trust and connection with their bodies and their babies during their own unique journey into motherhood. If she has learned anything through her experience with birth, it is that every birth is as different as the women who are laboring. On August 17th, 2011 Katharine “Katie” McCall, a licensed midwife, was convicted of practicing medicine with out a license for a 2007 birth she assisted as a student. The charge arose from a home birth where Katie's supervising midwife could not arrive because she was at another birth. Instead of leaving the family to birth unassisted, Katie stayed. She recommended that the family transfer to the hospital and the family refused. They were aware that she was only a student midwife and that she was unable to secure an overseeing mid View all posts by supportmidwifekatiemccall

2 responses to “Day 3: 264 Hours Remaining

  • Ardele

    Wow…brought tears to my eyes. Thanks for sharing this story. I don’t think I knew your daddy died while serving. Sorry, Katie.

  • bloog

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